Dark Fibre Network – Drift

Under the streets of East London runs a network of dark fibre.

Map of the London Dark Fibre Network

The Dark Fibre Network Drift – will walk the route of underground fibre-optic cables linking seven of the core data centres that form the London Internet Exchange.

The walk will include spoken word by Dr Robin Bale and experiments using software-defined radio to hack the sonic world of machine to machine communications carried out by CODED GEOMETRY.

Meet: 12:00 Sunday 27 October

Chrisp Street Market,
Market Square,
Poplar,
London,
E14 6AQ

Giant Invisible Pulsating Electromagnetic Sphere Hovering Above My Orange Settee

orangesettee-web

The emergence of the digital city can be traced back to the end of 2003 and the beginning of 2004. WIFI was just starting to have an impact on peoples’ everyday life. The 802.11g standard had been launched giving WIFI faster speeds and enabling coverage over much greater distances. This was greeted with a utopian political movement, led by activist groups such as YouAreHere [1] in London and free2air in Berlin. Their aim was to build and mesh local area wireless networks to provide communities with Open Distributed Public Wireless (ODPW). YouAreHere set itself the goal of developing a wireless backbone reaching from Limehouse to Hackney Central. They constructed a series of masts at strategic sites along the route. One of the most significant masts was mounted on the top of Limehouse Town Hall, which also housed the headquarters of the London Psychogeographical Association (LPA) [2].

At the same time, third generation (3G) wireless mobile telecommunications technology was rapidly being introduced to providing faster internet speeds for mobile devices. In contrast to the optimism of the ODPW activists, the introduction of 3G was met with anxiety, paranoia and fear. The roll-out of 3G technology involved the siting of a network of mobile phone masts throughout the country. In East London, the rooftops of high rise buildings on working class estates were chosen to locate the majority of these masts. Around the country, residents had begun tearing down mobile-phone masts, as public concerns over the untested health impact of the radiation they emit hit national headlines. The Telegraph reported [3] that in one week as many as four masts were destroyed in a campaign to stop them being placed on top of, or close to, peoples’ houses. Working class people accused the mobile phone companies of using them as guinea pigs. In Hackney, a group of Kurdish activists chained themselves to a mast while it was still on the lorry delivering it to be installed on the roof of their block. In London Fields, one 90 year old resident of the Wayman Court estate refused to move from a site adjacent to his flat that had been given planning permission for a mast.

In this febrile atmosphere of utopianism and paranoia, it was clear that the construction of wireless and mobile networks signalled a significant transformation of the landscape. I purchased an A-Com receiver used by telecoms engineers and started to listen to the new world of data transmissions. The crackle of white noise greeted me as I switched it on. I noticed a distant pulsing signal that drew me towards it. I was in the front room of my flat and its intensity increased as I started to approach my settee. The sound throbbed with metallic bass tones. I moved my receiver towards the settee then back again. The signal was surprisingly spatial. I carefully traced its shape revealing an invisible pulsating electromagnetic sphere hovering above my orange settee. From that moment, I saw the city as overlaid with invisible lines, shapes and structures, a coded geometry of machine to machine interactions beyond our perception.

As the UK prepares to introduce 5G cellular network technology, I am struck by an overwhelming sense of Déjà vu. Time seems to be punctured by accelerating epochs of pseudo progress X to the power n. 5G transmissions are broadcast on frequencies between 3.4 – 3.6GHz. These waves travel shorter distances through urban spaces, so 5G networks require more transmitter masts than previous technologies, positioned closer to ground level. The construction of the 5G network has sparked viral conspiracies, renewed health fears and an angle grinder attack by residents of one working class estate in Manchester. The next generation of utopian media artists are already presenting critical 5G projects at media arts festivals.

sdr1-web

CODED GEOMETRY is scanning the 3.4 to 3.6GHz spectrum using new antenna designs connected to Software Defined Radio (SDR). We are conducting research analysing and mapping the structures, invisible geographies and ambience this technology is bringing into being. Researching the spatial aesthetics these new circuits of digitality are bringing forth. Asking how they will shape our understand and experience of space and spatiality which are already inscribed by, but not reducible to, digital systems.

_____________________

[1] For more information about YouAreHere see – http://www.metamute.org/editorial/articles/network-people

[2] The LPA was originally suggested by the British artist Ralph Rumney in 1957 and reinvoked, in the early 1990s as the LPA East London Section. For more information see – https://maydayrooms.org/archives/the-london-psychogeographical-association/

[3] See Daniel Foggo, 30 Nov 2003, Protesters topple mobile phone masts as health scare spreads, The Telegraph. see – https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/1448109/Protesters-topple-mobile-phone-masts-as-health-scare-spreads.html

Silicon Roundabout

Screening of Cleansing the Silicon Roundabout

Depford Cinima

Sunday 8th May

Between 7pm – 7:45pm

Part of: Out of the Rubble – an evening of short films, discussion and debate about the future of public space in Deptford.

As works begin on transforming Old Street roundabout we thought it was worth returning to this documentary produced in 2013 as a response to the now scaled back redevelopment originally proposed by David Cameron and Boris Jonson.

Film by: Chris Jack, Sasha Scott, and John Wild. Featuring performance by Robin Bale

Either/Or

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Even Salon: Either/Or 

In Either/Or the principle of exclusivity undergoes détournement by a diverse range of invited participants. Either celebrate its brutal 2-state logic cutting across a stacked earth, or contest such sovereignty in precipitating each uncanny flip or flop glimpsed struggling against its slitted foreclosure. KISS!! In an evening of unemployable expenditure, from the trauma of the binary to its ontic co-constituency, Either/Or includes talks and performances by:

± Annabelle Stapleton-Crittenden
± Claude Heiland-Allen
± CODED GEOMETRY
± Daniel Rourke
± David Cunningham
± Jahan Nazeer
± Jamka
± Jennifer Boyd
± JeongEun Park
± Mari Ohno
± Ryo Ikeshiro
± Stephen Cornford

April 30th 2016
Doors open 7:30pm (’til late!)
Tickets £3
Apiary Studios, Hackney.

Full lineup details: http://even.org.uk/?even-salon-either-or
Apiary Studios: http://www.apiarystudios.org

The Hauntology of Technical Objects :: Hackney Séance

<< The Hauntology of Technical objects :: Hackney Séance >>

Date :: 26 April 2016

Time :: 10 pm

Meet  :: Bohemia Place, Hackney (Map)

Cities are haunted by ghosts. Past events linger within space. The subterranean Hackney Brook follows the path of the railway bridge as it flows under Mare Street. Bohemia Place, a small row of railway arches running to its left was the landing site of a second world war parachute mine, leaving a scar on the landscape that continues to effect the present.

Ghosts and spectres fascinated Friedrich Kittler.  He perceived electricity’s displacement of the dead from the book and into technically reproducible media. He found them within the disembodied voices of the radio broadcasts and made the claim that ghosts, a.k.a. media, cannot die at all (Kittler, 1999, p.130). Donna Haraway was aware that, Pre-cybernetic machines could be haunted; there was always the spectre of the ghost in the machine. This dualism structured the dialogue between materialism and idealism that was settled by a dialectical progeny, called spirit or history, according to taste. (Haraway, 1991, p.152). Kittler’s invoking of ghosts is coupled with his construction of comprehensive media genealogies that link contemporary technologies to a technological a priori, often rooted within in the battlefields of world war n+1, but making its presence known in the technological everyday of the present. The spectres in Kittler’s genealogies are not those of humans; they are autonomous technological spectres that form their own anti-humanist hauntings.

Join us for a séance that ritualistically linked the site of a second world war bomb, the intersection of the underground Hackney Brook and the railway bridge passing over Mare Street and the technological ghosts haunting the Oystercard readers at Hackney train station.

Travelodge Easter Mass

CODED GEOMETRY :: Travelodge Easter Mass

[Read as PDF]

Circumstances too complicated to explain lead to me waking on Easter Sunday alone in a Travelodge on the outskirts of Milton Keynes.

A minimalist single room with eggshell blue walls, an open hanging rail for clothes, a desk supporting a kettle with a collection of individually packaged teas and coffees, and a single bed positioned to face a 65” wall mounted flat screen TV.

The windows looked out onto a Motorway intersection leaving me with no illusion; I was nowhere, marooned, with a constant flow of vehicles passing, moving between places with the vindictive aim of emphasising my predicament. Even Easter Sunday hadn’t altered the relentless flow all heading elsewhere.

Recognising that I would not be able to continue my journey until the morning I switched on the TV. A fault with the hotel’s satellite receiver had rendered all the channels blank with the exception of one that was receiving a disrupted signal.

CODED GEOMETRY :: Travelodge Easter Mass

Competing images overlaid each other: sections disintegrating into psychedelic digital interference. The channel was undecipherable in any conventional sense, yet somehow compelling.

Broken fragments of religious iconography, a cross in the centre, a close up of burning candles, the outline of a figure in ceremonial robes, features morphing in a process of RGB fractal degeneration, geometric disturbances punctured organic forms and revealed a gathered congregation.

Fragmented Images obscured the reading of a coherent totality, yet the interference reconstituted pieces into alluring sequences, producing a new whole, possibly a new religion.

CODED GEOMETRY :: Travelodge Easter Mass

A jolly earcon, Popcorn I think, distracted my attention from the screen and towards my phone. Breaking news,

‘Pakistani Taliban faction Jamaat ul-Ahrar says Christians were target of bomb that killed 72 and injured 280 in a park thronged with families… The bomber blew himself up near an entrance to Gulshan-e-Iqbal Park, close to a children’s play area. The sound of the explosion was heard several kilometres away and eyewitnesses said there were big crowds in the area because of the Easter holiday’.

CODED GEOMETRY :: Travelodge Easter Mass

Religion has re-immerged as a significant political force in the era of mass digital communications. Even factions of the British working class have not been immune, with football hooligans mobilised, imagining themselves as modern day crusaders, picking up the standard of St. George, declaring themselves Infidels, or invoking the Bible to put Britain first.

Violent street armies gather in Dover to defend Christian values by closing the borders.  Islam is at the forefront of the hatred, but speeches bring to the fore older antagonisms; Irish Catholics. Chants of No Surrender. A swastika daubed in blood.

CODED GEOMETRY :: Travelodge Easter Mass

The images continue to reconstitute themselves, a constant stream of becoming punctured sporadically by stuttering metallic tourettes audio outbursts.

neurofeedback

CODED GEOMETRY :: Dark Side of the Earth

CODED GEOMETRY will collaborate in an experiment with the Indigo Mind Project.  A brain-computer interface that reads fluctuating electro-encephalograph (EEG) signals and maps them to compose a multilayered soundscape.

CODED GEOMETRY will explore nonlinear neuro-feedback and affective responses through a complex circuit of interchange, both responding to the soundscape being produced by the participants psycho-physiological state but also by affecting the participants psycho-physiological state through the projected images of a live digital drift through the glitchy, militarised and contested space of GIS satellite imaging.

The experiment will take place on Wednesday 23rd March from 6pm -8pm

Emotion lab,
Docklands Campus,
University of East London

Part of: Affect and Social Media Symposium & Sensorium exhibition.